ROAST TURKEY


Turkey is normally eaten from fall to the spring. Because the harvest is in the fall, the foods reflect the time of year. For example, there are a variety of root vegetables, such as squash, also there are cranberries and of course Turkey. Cranberry Sauce is a great "sharp" accompaniment to the sweet turkey meat. Every-one loves Cranberry Sauce and it is so easy to make!

Gwai Lo Cranberry Sauce

INGREDIENTS
12 oz berries
7oz. Water
7oz. Orange Juice
1/4 cup sugar
orange zest
1 oz kirsh - an austrian clear liquer used often with fruit in french cooking

METHODS
Bring water, orange juice and sugar to a boil. Add Cranberries and cook for 20 minutes, stirring occasionally Reduce by half while skimming off the scum. In the last 3 minutes add the ounce of kirsh. Take off the heat add the zest. Put some of the cranberries aside. Put in a blender and process until smooth. Cool and fill a squeese tube and paint the plate just before serving or if you don't have a squeeze bottle use a spoon. Dice the reserved berries.


Bread Stuffing for Turkey

For a 10 lb. bird you need:
12 cups of stuffing
12 cups of bread crumbs (2 to 2 and 1/2 loaves of bread)
3/4 cup vegetable oil
1 1/2 tsp salt
2 tbsp poultry seasoning
1/2 tsp pepper
2 medium onions (diced and saute'd)
2 carrots clean and shredded

Mix all of the ingredients together. Add water if necessary until it holds together. Water can be drawn from the giblets which have be cooked in a pressure cooker for about 20 minutes, puree'd and then add to the mix. 12 lb. Bird For 10 to12 people, you can divide it in half for 4 to 6 people. Heat the oven to 375° F. Wash the bird. Cut the tendons and ligaments in the legs. Stuff the bird as fully as you can. Some people sew it closed, however, this method is easier. It is called trussing and I'll show you how. Place the turkey in front of you with the legs facing toward you. Take a long piece of butcher's twine - a few feet and slip it under the carcass close to you, criss-cross over the legs, take each side of the string to the back of the turkey and tie to the back holding the wings in. Now this part (near the legs) is also known as the Parson's Nose. Some people fight over this "end" if you can imagine! Place on a rack in a pan Place some fat or bacon across the narrow part of the breast. This helps keep it from drying out. Place the pan in the oven a roast for 20 minutes a pound. A 12 lb. bird requires 4 hours of cooking Baste it from time to time with the fat in the bottom of the pan, but do not use the liquid for it will dry out the meat. To know when it is done, pierce the inside of the drumstick with a fork or knife, if the liquid runs both clear and colourless on a white plate the bird is done. If there is any colour it is not yet fully cooked! This rule is so easy because it applies to chickens as well. Remove from the oven, cover the bird and let it rest for 20 to 30 minutes to allow juices to redistribute. Meanwhile prepare the gravy.

Gravy

1/3 cup all purpose flour
5 tbsp butter
3 cups of chicken stock
2 tbps of fresh rosemary

Mix the flour with some of the chicken stock to make a paste Take the juices from the turkey pan, remove the fat, and add to the chicken stock to make four cups in total. Add the rosemary, bring to the boil, slowly beat in the flour mixture. If the gravy is not smooth at this point or it has lumps, pass it through a strainer, beat in the other two tablespoons of butter, add salt and pepper as you like it and that's it! Set aside to stay warm.

Carve the turkey Cut the legs off between the thigh and the breast. Cut the leg in half and slice the meat off in sections. Do the same for the other leg. You should get four slices for each leg and two at least for each thigh. Pull the wing a bit and cut near to the shoulder joint and in fact through the joint. Remove the wing but leave whole. Arrange all neatly on a serving plate if serving buffet. Carve the breast by putting the fork against the breast bone and begin to slice one side by start parallel to the breast bone but cutting on a diagonal. Arrange neatly in a row on the serving plate if serving buffet. A long slender knife with a bit of a curve at the front is best for this type of slicing. Of course it should be sharp! Serve this feast with brussel sprouts which have been blanched and saute'd with bacon and mashed potatoes.

Dessert is usually always pumpkin pie. Beaujolais would go well with the turkey.


Pumpkin Pie

Two Pie Shells
Pumpkin Puree 3 cups
Half and half 1 cup
Water 1/2 cup
Cream (35%) 1/2
cup Sugar 1 cup
Eggs 4
Cinnamon 1/2 tsp
Ginger 1/2 tsp
Allspice 1/8 tsp
Salt 1/2 tsp

Heat Oven to 375 F Mix all together and bake for approximately 1 hour until the filling is set in the same way as custard.


Copyright 2014 Gwai Lo Inc. all rights reserved

Tip 1
Whenever cooking poultry or foul cut the tendons and ligaments at the end of the leg. This will allow the meat to shrink up and stay moist so the entire leg is edible.

Tip 2
Some people use the technique of flouring the bird to make it appear more brown and to help crisp up the skin. This is especially useful when the bird cooks for a long time, such as turkey. Pour a plain vegetable oil on top of the bird and rub all over. Dust lightly with flour before roasting.


Copyright © GWAI LO INC. 2014